Neglected at Their Very Homeland

Persecution and violence against minorities as experienced by the Ahmadiyah congregation continued to harass me. Specifically since the Cikuesik tragedy, where people could brutally destroy and kill others without humanity. The same incident almost happened to the Ahmadiyah congregation in Bukit Duri, South Jakarta, where persecution and sealing of the Ahmadiyah’s mosque took place again.  

Encouraged by the curiosity of what actually happened and what the ahamdiyah is teachings made me ventured to enter and conduct direct interviews with the leadership of the Ahmadiyah congregation, although the conditions at that time were not very much conducive because people anti-Ahmadiyah were guarding at an-Nur Mosque entrance, where the Ahmadiyah concgregation are praying. From the conversation at that time I sympathized with our Ahmadiyah friends who has to experience persecution and violence. 

The photos about the Ahmadiyah Congregation emphasized morality and humanity beside views of some people who consider this teaching is misguided. With these photos I want to focus on the injustice that our country has failed to protect its citizens, especially minorities. I want to invite readers to look a little farther that there are other things that are more important than judging someone’s beliefs, more over that the justification arises to do violence against people of different faiths.  

the remnants of the destruction of an Ahmadi follower’s house.Persecution followed by violent action forces armada followers to flee from their own land as they are considered to be wrong and having different faith.

A remnant of Quran lies at the ruins of a house owned by an Ahmadi follower in Grepek Village.”We are considered to be heretical,yet they cannot show us our heresy we all share the same holy book,also the same way of prayers and syahadat (a confesion of islamic faith”,said Jasman.

The House ruins,the dust out of burning house, a holly book covered by dust and graffiti on walls are all that is left in former houses of Ahmady followers.Nothing but the faith in their hearts remains intact.

Aje, popularly called as Pa’pu Nas (70), could not hide his sadness when sharing the story about the persecution and his expulsion from home he experienced for three times in Greneng Village. Pa’pu Nas is well known for his skill in curing illness. Some villagers once asked him to return home, yet he rejected it as he still felt traumatic.

In an 3-month pregnancy, Masrini (29) ran away from angry people that destroyed her house, along with her husband Edy Sucipto and first child Abdur Rohman. They hid in the forest near the village before being rescued by officers who took them to the refugee camp. In the refugee camp, Masrinigave birth to a second child named Abdul Rohman.

Itah (50) stays from one place to another place because of a frequent persecution and expulsion. The old lady has to accept the reality of being forced to spend her old days in a refugee shelter as she finds no safety elsewhere due to her choice of faith.

Leaning against the wall at refugee shelter, Pa’pu Nas and his wife resign themselves to their fate of having to spend their old days in uncertainty an no safety.

“love for all, there is no hatred for all,we will not repay what they done,” said Edy Sucipto, an Ahmadi.

Irwan Jayadi (28) with his wife Masiah (24) and his daughter Zaskia Amelza (6) and his mother -in-law Iyah (50) were forced to leave the village of Montongtani, Sakra Timur Lombok in May 2018 just as they were fasting due to persecution and threatened to be killed for their beliefs,Ahmadiyah.Masiah is now carrying 8 months pregnancy from her marriage with Irwan jayad.

Repeatedly do Ahmady followers experience violence, persecutions, and expulsions. To live without safety or live in a refugee shelter,just like living in prison, is not something they or anybody wishes.

Since the persecution started, they have been living in uncertainly. Some of them are lucky enough to do any job such as being coolies, street vendors or scavengers to survive,although they still own land, rice fields, plantations which are supposed to provide them with fixed income. “Nowhere in the world do citizens become refugees in their own country,in their very homeland,” said Edy Supriyadi.Since the persecution started, they have been living in uncertainly. Some of them are lucky enough to do any job such as being coolies, street vendors or scavengers to survive,although they still own land, rice fields, plantations which are supposed to provide them with fixed income. “Nowhere in the world do citizens become refugees in their own country,in their very homeland,” said Edy Supriyadi.

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